Automakers Are Adding Electric Vehicles to Lineups

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Many automakers have detailed plans to electrify large portions of their fleets over the next decade, with some announcing goals for fully electrified lineups in as little as five years.

Consumers might not even have to wait that long. A record number of almost 100 pure battery electric vehicles (BEVs) are set to debut by the end of 2024 if all goes according to plan.

“These more affordable models have the potential to sway a significant percentage of the car-buying public toward buying an EV with their efficiency, performance, and lower ownership costs,” says Gabe Shenhar, associate director of Consumer Reports’ Auto Test Center.

For consumers, the rapid expansion of the EV market will make it difficult to keep up with all the changes. To help out, here is our rundown of each manufacturer’s EV production plans for the years ahead.

American Honda Motor Co.BMW North America • Ford Motor CompanyGeneral MotorsHyundai Motor CompanyJaguar Land Rover LimitedKia Motors AmericaMazda Motor CompanyMercedes-Benz USAMitsubishi Motors North AmericaNissan North AmericaStellantis North AmericaSubaru of AmericaTesla MotorsToyota Motor SalesVolkswagen Group of AmericaVolvo Group North America

American Honda Motor Co.

New BEVs on the horizon? Yes.

The company aims for all its sales to be zero-emissions, electrified vehicles by 2040. The projected ramp-up to this goal is 40 percent of sales by 2030 and 80 percent of sales by 2035.

American Honda—which sells popular Honda- and Acura-branded cars, SUVs, and pickups to American consumers—has long dabbled in electrified cars.

They range from the Civic hybrid, CRZ, and Insight to more recent models like the Accord hybrid, CR-V hybrid, and Clarity hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and electric.

Honda signed a memorandum of understanding with General Motors in late 2020 that would allow Honda to make use of GM’s upcoming Ultium batteries—a proprietary technology GM says will allow long-range electric travel, among other benefits.

The accord also calls for mutual vehicle platform-sharing, which will allow either automaker to use the basic building blocks of GM’s electric vehicle architecture in designing and building its own cars.

The automaker has announced that it will have its first electric vehicles based on the e:Architecture platform by model year 2024, starting with the Prologue launching in early 2024 in North America.

Automotive News reported in January that Honda has plans to build a Honda EV in 2023 at a GM plant in Mexico, and an Acura EV in 2024 at the GM plant in Tennessee where GM plans to build the Cadillac Lyriq EV.

BMW North America

New BEVs on the horizon? Yes.

BMW got into the EV game relatively early with its i3, an electric city car that has had limited success in the U.S. since becoming available at dealerships here for the 2014 model year.

The automaker has teased concept EVs including the i4, iX, and Vision, and recently announced plans to introduce electric versions of the 5 Series and 7 Series sedans, and the X1 SUV.

In all, BMW says it will bring roughly a dozen new EVs to market by 2025. Mini and Rolls-Royce also fall under the BMW umbrella, with a Mini Cooper electric model already available. There have been rumors of an upcoming Rolls-Royce EV, which could be called the Silent Shadow.

Ford Motor Company

New BEVs on the horizon? Yes.

Ford says its passenger vehicles will be 100 percent emissions-free in Europe by 2030. It hasn’t made the same commitment in the U.S., but does sell an electric SUV called the Mustang Mach-E and an electric version of its commercial Transit van.

In addition to the Mustang Mach-E and the e-Transit, Ford has plans to introduce an electric version of its popular F-150 pickup, dubbed F-150 Lightning, for sale in spring 2022.

Ford says that its Lincoln luxury brand has projected that half its global sales will be zero-emissions models by the middle of this decade and that it will electrify the entire portfolio of vehicles by 2030.

General Motors

New BEVs on the horizon? Yes.

GM—which includes the Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, and GMC brands—has a long history with EVs that began in the late 1990s with the EV1. Then came the Chevrolet Volt plug-in hybrid and the all-electric Chevrolet Bolt, which is currently the most reliable EV, according to Consumer Reports’ reliability survey.

GM announced in January that it aspires to have an all-electric model lineup by 2035, and that by the end of 2025, 40 percent of its models will be pure EVs. While that certainly isn’t a binding commitment, it does signal a significant change in direction for the company, which stressed that it won’t be making hybrids or plug-in hybrids, which it considers transitional technology.

GM has recently introduced a redesigned Bolt and the Bolt EUV, an SUV variant.

On the horizon is the GMC Hummer EV, an impressive-looking off-road truck that is scheduled to arrive early in 2022. This will be followed by a Hummer SUV, an electric Silverado-based pickup, and a pair of Cadillac EVs, the Lyriq SUV and the Celestiq sedan.

Hyundai Motor Company

New BEVs on the horizon? Yes.

Hyundai already has the Kona Electric and the Ioniq Electric models on the market, and recently unveiled the first of three planned models in its all-electric Ioniq sub-brand—the Ioniq 5 SUV.

Genesis, Hyundai’s premium brand, is expected to pull back the curtain on its own EVs in the not-too-distant future. Hyundai says it aims to sell 1 million pure electric vehicles worldwide by 2025.

Jaguar Land Rover Limited

New BEVs on the horizon? Yes, but nothing concrete other than the I-Pace, which is already in production.

The storied English brands Jaguar and Land Rover have been a subsidiary of Tata Motors, an Indian multinational firm, since 2008. The Jaguar side of the company has already made waves with its Tesla-fighting electric SUV, the I-Pace, but the company says the Land Rover side will have its first EV model by 2024.

According to an announcement the company made in early 2021, all Jaguar and Land Rover models will have an electric version by the end of the decade, with six new electric Land Rover SUVs over the next five years, and an all-electric Jaguar lineup by 2025.

Kia Motors America

New BEVs on the horizon? Yes.

Hyundai Motor Group, the parent company that owns Hyundai and Genesis, also owns a minority stake in Kia, which has plans to release a series of EVs that ride on the same E-GMP platform—which is a modular, EV-specific substructure with the batteries mounted in the floor—that will underpin Ioniq-branded EVs.

Kia already has an electric version of its Niro and says it will have 11 EVs—seven of them dedicated electric models—in its lineup by 2026. The first pure electric model in the series is the EV6.

The automaker says it wants to sell 1.6 million “eco-friendly vehicles” globally by the end of the decade.

Mazda Motor Company

New BEVs on the horizon? Not yet, but vague plans have been announced.

Mazda doesn’t yet offer any electric cars in the U.S., but it recently started selling the MX-30 EV and plug-in hybrid models in other markets.

Mazda says it plans to introduce an EV-only platform within the next few years, with all its nameplates available with some level of electrification by 2030. However, the automaker has not specified what proportion of its cars will be pure electric, and which ones will be plug-in hybrids or mild hybrids.

Mercedes-Benz USA

New BEVs on the horizon? Yes.

Mercedes’ electric push began in 2007, with an EV version of the diminutive Smart ForTwo city car. Now, the automaker says it has plans afoot to introduce 10 new EV models by 2022.

Mercedes says the U.S. market can expect to see the EQS, an electric version of its opulent flagship S-Class sedan, in fall 2021. Other EV models—SUVs like the EQA and EQB—are on hold for the U.S. market, but are expected to debut overseas.

Mercedes says the EQS, which will be the first Mercedes EV in the U.S. when it goes on sale this fall, will have a 435-mile range, although that number is based on European test standards that tend to be more optimistic than Environmental Protection Agency numbers.

Mitsubishi Motors North America

New BEVs on the horizon? Not yet.

Mitsubishi has a limited presence in North America. However, it has been partially owned by Nissan since 2016, and it has access to significant technical resources through the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance.

The company recently announced plans to expand its electrified lineup to 50 percent of its global sales by 2030. Mitsubishi introduced the short-lived i-MiEV, a small electric hatchback, around the same time as the Nissan Leaf, and already has plug-in hybrid models on the market. It is likely to continue relying on them to some extent to meet its electrification goals.

Nissan North America

New BEVs on the horizon? Yes.

Over the past decade, Nissan has sold half a million Leaf EVs around the world. As one of the first mass market EVs available in the U.S., it has been a staple of the growing electric fleet. The company’s next North America-bound electric model is the Ariya, a small SUV that is scheduled to go on sale late in 2021.

Nissan hasn’t announced any other upcoming electric models, but it does have a number of hybrids available in the U.S. It also has a hybrid technology called e-Power that uses a gasoline engine to generate electricity for an electric motor-driven powertrain, akin to how the Chevrolet Volt operated.

Peyman Kargar, the chairman of Infiniti, Nissan’s luxury marque, said in mid-2020 that his division would add a performance-oriented hybrid and a pure BEV to Infiniti’s lineup, although he didn’t specify when.

Stellantis North America

New BEVs on the horizon? Coming soon, led by the plug-in hybrid Jeep Wrangler 4xe and Jeep Grand Cherokee 4xe.

Early in 2021, the auto manufacturer that had been called Fiat Chrysler Automobiles merged with Groupe PSA, the company that houses the French Peugeot and Citroën brands, to become Stellantis. In North America, Stellantis includes the Alfa Romeo, Chrysler, Dodge, Fiat, Jeep, Maserati, and Ram truck brands.

Stellantis announced a major worldwide EV initiative in July 2021, declaring that all its brands are committed to offering fully electric vehicles. Key to this is the introduction of four electric platforms, with ranges from 300 to 500 miles.

The company known for its Hemi V8 engines aims for 40 percent of its models sold in the U.S. to be low-emissions vehicles. It said it expected battery costs to drop significantly over the next few years, aiding it in this goal. By 2024, it expects to have two battery technologies in place (a high-density option and a nickel cobalt-free version), with solid state batteries available by 2026.

Jeep promises a “zero emission vehicle in every segment” by 2025. Dodge pledges an electric muscle car—think: a Charger that uses a charger—in 2024. And Ram plans a full-sized electric truck by 2024.

Subaru of America

New BEVs on the horizon? Not yet.

Subaru has long been associated with its horizontally opposed “boxer” engines that feature two pairs of cylinders that lie flat and supposedly allow for a lower center of gravity.

But the automaker announced in early 2021 that it would offer some form of electrification on all its models by mid-decade. Like Mazda, Subaru didn’t get into specifics regarding the proportion of vehicles that would be EVs, plug-in hybrids, and hybrids.

Tesla Motors

New BEVs on the horizon? Yes, although concrete dates have not yet been given.

Tesla is an innovative American company focused on building electric vehicles. It launched with a roadster, followed by the Model S hatchback and the Model X SUV.

These latter vehicles are known for impressive driving range and technological innovation, particularly in regard to ongoing improvements through over-the-air updates and driver assistance systems.

The Model 3 sedan has broadened the brand’s appeal. The line also includes the recent Model Y crossover—delivering a driving range of 300-plus miles but a stiff ride.

The Model S has just received a significant update, with a freshened exterior and interior, as well as new Plaid high-performance version. Expect to see a pickup truck and second-generation roadster in the near future. Tesla got an early start among EV brands, but it will soon face a flood of new competition.

Toyota Motor Sales

New BEVs on the horizon? Yes, but we haven’t seen anything concrete yet.

Along with its luxury division, Lexus, Toyota has been building cars and SUVs with hybrid powertrains for decades now. In 20 years of Prius production, Toyota sold more than 6 million of the utilitarian hybrids, which are known equally for their efficiency and reliability.

More recently, the automaker moved into hydrogen fuel-cell-powered cars with its Mirai, which was just redesigned.

A hydrogen fuel cell, like the batteries used in BEVs, generates electricity to power the car motor (or motors). Though it doesn’t need to be recharged, it does require a steady supply of hydrogen fuel from an onboard fuel tank.

According to the Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center, there are only a handful of hydrogen filling stations, and all of them are in California, so adoption has been predictably slow.

Toyota recently announced a partnership with Shell to build more hydrogen stations, but EV charging stations have proliferated much more quickly.

Still, Toyota has a dedicated EV platform under development, and the company says it will add two EVs and a plug-in hybrid to its selection in 2021, and will offer electrified (either hybrid or plug-in hybrid) versions of a variety of models between now and 2025.

Volkswagen Group of America

New BEVs on the horizon? Yes.

In the wake of its diesel emissions scandal—dubbed “dieselgate” by many observers—Volkswagen committed itself to becoming an EV-focused auto manufacturer. Volkswagen Group includes Audi, Bentley, Bugatti, Lamborghini, Porsche, and Volkswagen under its umbrella.

The corporation says it will launch 70 pure electric vehicles and 60 hybrids by the end of the decade, some of which are already in production.

VW’s most recent addition is the Volkswagen ID.4, a small electric SUV aimed at mass market consumers. Audi already had an E-Tron model in production, and recently introduced its stunning electric flagship, the E-Tron GT, which is built on the same platform as the equally fetching Porsche Taycan EV.

Even Bentley will get in on the EV revolution, and its CEO says all Bentleys will be plug-ins—either hybrid or pure electric—by 2026, and all Bentleys will be electric-only by the end of the decade.

The Lamborghini component has been more coy about potential electrification plans, although the Terzo Millennio concept unveiled in 2017 invites speculation into the company’s plans.

Volvo Group North America

New BEVs on the horizon? Yes.

While some auto manufacturers have been vague about the timing of electric vehicles, Volvo has been straightforward about its plan to build only pure electric vehicles by the end of the decade.

Zhejiang Geely Holding Group—the Chinese company that also owns Lotus—has owned Volvo since 2010. Volvo already has one electric model out—the XC40 Recharge—and Polestar, which was once Volvo’s performance sub-brand, is slated to be all-electric soon.

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